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20121201
20121231
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CSPAN 13
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English 18
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18
. controversial right-to-work measures will soon be the law of the land in michigan. republican governor rick snider signed the law despite wide protests at the capitol. the law will make it illegal for a union employee to pay union dues as a condition of their employment. >> let's explain that. just for half a second. then we'll go on. right to work, what does it mean? people ask me, what does it mean? it means unions can force somebody to pay them if they want to get a job in the state of michigan. >> well, what it means is, if you get a job, the union extracts money from your paycheck for the dues for union dues. >> well, yeah. >> automatically. >> automatically. >> you've got no choice. oh, you want to work here? well, you've got to pay us. >> right. >> what if i don't want to pay you? what if i don't want to support the candidates you support? what if they're the antithesis of my values? too bad. and so i've never understood this. >> governor snider says it was the unions who started the fight in the first place. by trying to add collective bargaining rights in the state's constitution.
open between the speaker and the president. president obama took his argument to michigan yesterday, where he also weighed in on a right to work all that's making its way through the state today -- a right to work law. do you support or oppose those laws? michigan will become the 24th state to have one. the phone lines are open. also, send us a tweet or a facebook post, or send us an e- mail. here's what the president said yesterday in michigan. [video clip] >> these right to work law don't have to do with economics. they have everything to do with politics. what they are really talking about is giving you the right to work for less money. [cheers and applause] you only have to look to michigan, where workers were instrumental in reviving the auto industry and to see how unions have helped to build not just a straw upper-middle-class but a stronger america -- stronger middle-class but a stronger america. people and should be focused on the same pink. they should be working to make sure companies like this manufacturer is able to make more great products. that's what they should be f
from michigan. >> the gentleman from michigan is recognized for three minutes. >> he this is an important moment, an important moment. these bills move the nation dangerously closer to the cliff with only 11 days before our nation would go over it. they make finding common ground far more difficult, with only 11 days left to find it. these bills are not a plan, they are a ploy. they are builds to nowhere. they undermine trust essential for agreement. we just heard. the republicans claim letting the tax rate go up from 35% to 39.6% on income over $1 million is not a tax hike because they would happen on its own. then they say that if the tax cut would go up on income below $1 million by having on its own, it would be the biggest tax increase in history. that is patently inconsistent. far worse than the hypocrisy is the way they designed their tax provisions. for those with incomes over $1 million, they have provided tax cuts of at least $50,000. they raise only 1/3 of the revenue contained in the speaker's discussions with the white house and far less than proposed by
: i thank the gentleman, i yield a minute and a half to the gentleman from michigan. mr. curson: my grandson stood here with me when i took my oath of office one of the proudest moments of my life. just moments before this horrible act took place, michigan's lame duck legislators allowed persons to bring concealed firearms into schools, college dorms, churches, hospitals, bars and sports stadiums. firearms have absolutely no place in our schools. the tragic massacre at sandy hook is a chilling and heartbreaking reminder of this. last week, innocent children, babies, went to school to a safe place where they loved to be. six public servants went to school to the children they loved almost as much as their own. those six died trying to save those precious gifts. 20 of those babies were savagely murdered. we witnessed this who are endous murders before at virginia tech, 16 murdered at the university of texas as austin, 13 students and faculty murdered at columbine. i support reasonable gun ownership. senate bill 59 is now sitting on governor snyder's desk. in the spirit of this resolut
that we get our economy in full gear. wand that i yield to mr. levin. >> the gentleman from michigan. >> i did not know i would follow the distinguished majority leader. i just want to say i mostly want to talk about plan c but for him or anybody else to come on the floor and say the president hasn't proposed spending cuts, it isn't true and it undercuts the necessary level of trust to find common ground. that kind of a statement should not be made. i said in the rules committee for three hours, participated for two last night. there was no reference to plan c. and it came up just a few minutes secretly before midnight. the purpose of plan c is to try to get votes for plan b twn republican conference. and what it does is to undermine the affordable care act by eliminating the protections and it would result in the loss of health insurance coverage for 420,000 people. it would repeal the block grant, is social services block grant, services for millions of americans and it wasn't machine years ago when chairman camp wrote ssg has been a key source of funding -- of flexible funding for criti
and love the outdoors, which is why i especially want to highlight our work to protect lake michigan. beginning with the first bill i introduced in the house, the great lakes water protection act, along with my good friends, i'm proud of our efforts to keep lake michigan clean. this legislation would prohibit waste water pollution from running into the great lakes, but our work to protect the 10th district's most cherished natural resource did not stop there. we focused on in supporting great lakes initiative through authoring and supporting funding amendments and advocating its importance, all to make sure this important program to protect the great lakes is adequately funded. i'm proud we have been able to facilitate the cleanup of waukegan harbor. it has finally started under our watch. so much work in getting this accomplished has happened and i want to thank suesey and jerry and cam for their dedicated service for cleaning up the harbor. getting finally lake county's pathway to the great lakes. i also want to highlight another cause which i have been proud to champion and that i
on the university of michigan law school plan had been upheld into the very thing grutter v. bollinger that have followed the plan closely enough so the court was obliged to uphold it. even one justice, judge garza, who said he hated racial preference isn't about to strike them down said that he had no choice but to uphold this one has been under supreme court precedent. by the way, seven of the 16 justices disagreed and thought you could strike it down under the career precedent. so the case finds its way to the supreme court and it's likely to perhaps become the most important case in history on racial preferences. not so much because there's anything that extraordinary about this case, but the composition of the court has changed his 2003 cases which could be fairly green light to racial preferences, very large racial preferences as long as they're camouflaged beneath the kind of complicated, holistic thing. holistic is like the word or sprinkle holy water over preferences. so here's how it worked at the university of texas. they have an academic index for people outside the top 10%. they hav
states. host: let's get a republican voice. our next caller is calling from west bloomfield, michigan, on the republican line. good morning. caller: i would like to get your thoughts on a balanced approach and have unbiased taxation by using a flat tax. that way you can calculate the amount of taxes we need for the deficit over 10 years. another point is to control the spending on entitlements by not giving millionaires social security benefits, thereby satisfying president obama's approach. instead of doing it through taxation, he can do it through the entitlements. guest: those are both ideas that have been raised, especially the social security and medicare benefits for the wealthy and potentially might not need them to live off of. one tricky part of that is wealthier americans have been paying these taxes for decades into social security and medicare if and a lot of folks have a problem with the idea of taking away their benefits they have paid for if just because they happen to be more well off. and issued the first caller raised and something to watch is this could really sort
twitter comments. atxn -- vatex and m ike says -- jim in michigan, the republican line, good morning. caller: some things i would like to see more of you hear a lot of people talking about voting for somebody who they believe is this gender or this race. let's put someone in place of character and experience and somebody who has done things. getting back to allowing the people to build the country when we were individuals. i think that is important. i think there is a lot more of this collectivism. we're never going to be able to have a president to help these different countries if we are hurting our own country here and we are not able to grow it. host: tie that into hillary clinton in 2016. caller: i think my concern about her in some regards is tha ti think i do not know how strong of a business persian she is. i think she is more of a liberal to moderate which is fine but i want to see somebody who is very much pro-u.s., pro-growth, and bring us back to growing us inside and promoting that as opposed to saying a more broader scope. i think that broader scope will come about when
times." host: nancy, our next caller. independent line, michigan. who is this on? society or government? caller: it is the role of everyone in the united states. i am getting rid of my guns. my husband was a police officer. i am getting rid of all of his guns. i do not have the need for them and i do not think that it worked out for -- worked out well for her either. host: that is your personal choice. do you think that the government should follow up on that? should society do what you're doing? caller: it is up to every individual. how has this affected all of us? i think we should all work together to try our best to prevent this from happening ever again. personally, my choice is to get rid of all of the handguns and all of the weapons that were my husband's. the guns are not needed. it is my role, it is your role, it is the role of the government. host: democratic line, manhattan. good morning. cecil, what do you think? caller: all of the people that were harassing teachers about the price of what they charge their states for the work that they do, who would want to be a teacher in
're just doing it the way the university of michigan law school did it, and so we're okay. there are a number of distinctions between the cases, though, that we think will help the, you know, the now-more skeptical about racial preferences court strike down tease preferences. they wouldn't have to overrule the grutter case to do so, because the grutter case justice o'connor articulated some principles that were supposed to limit the size and duration of racial preferences to avoid abuses, but she department really enforce them. -- she didn't really enforce them. but they remain on the books. you're supposed to pursue race-neutral alternatives before you resort to race. well, texas did. they have this 10% plan. they get a lot of racial diversity and other diversity from the 10% plan. did they really need to use individual racial preferences on top of it? that's one argument in her favor. another argument is the court has said no racial balancing, meaning you cannot try to mirror in your state's university's composition the racial proportions of the statewide population. tha
minutes to the gentleman from michigan, the distinguished ranking member of the committee on ways and means, mr. levin. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from michigan is recognized for three minutes. without objection. mr. levin: this is an important moment, an important moment. these bills move the nation dangerously closer to the cliff, with only 11 days before our nation would go over it. they make finding common ground far more difficult with only 11 days left to find it. these bills are not a plan. they're a ploy. they are bills to nowhere. they undermine trust so essential for agreement. we've just heard it. the republicans claim that letting the tax rate go up from 35% to 39.6% on income over $1 million is not a tax hike because it would happen on its own. but then they say that if the tax cut would go up on income below $1 million by happening on its own, it would be the biggest tax increase in history. that is patently that is inconsistent. the far worse than hypocrisy is the way they deseen their tax provision. for those with incomes over one million, they provide
scoring based upon race. if they do that, they might run afoul of the michigan problem. assigning numbers to it, which creates another type of problem. it is possible that ms. fisher might have been admitted to a summer program under which texas and that the number of people who are not admitted to regular programs. it's not clear to me whether she actually tried to get into that program. in any event, she was not actually admitted it. one of the arguments that she made is it is impossible to reconstruct what would've happened. and that maybe this is a lawsuit which could prevent the university of texas from going forward with this program in the future. the problem from ms. fisher's perspective is she has already completed the university. this is not a class action. she has not sought an injunction against future use of the program because she would have no standing. the only thing she is seeking at this time is monetary damages. the damages she has claimed as far as i am aware that she paid an application fee of $100 or something of that range. and she wants that feedback. we are not cl
, they are on the brink. we need to put some value into products and sell them here. host: mike from michigan offering his remedies to help fix the situation in the country. here is built king's take -- bill king on twitter. another story from "the washington post" -- you can read the full story on the unproductive 112th congress in today's washington post. it's good to jump from antenna on the republican line. caller: good morning, america. balancedalking about budgets and all these different things that we should be doing to help the country. i believe that the pier problem is the federal reserve. any country that has had a central bank and up failing and collapsing. we are no different than any other country. the loan us money and interest and we cannot pay it back. we have been doing that since around world war room one. host: regardless of what happens in 48 hours in the negotiations, you do not think we are dealing with the real issue? caller: yes, sir. we have to go back to american banks, not a central bank. until we do that, we will end up and voting on ourselves. it would be better to do it now
for charitable giving. back to the phones. jack in allenson, michigan, on our line for independents. go ahead, jack. caller: i want to ask mr. rosenberg if he has ever heard of lincoln electric in cleveland, ohio. host: and why did he wanted to know that? caller: well, they wrote a book, james f. lincoln wrote a book, a new approach to industrial economics where they have no unions. everybody is responsible for their own work. they do peace work. everybody's responsible. everybody has a lifetime job. they get huge pieces of the pie. and ownership is -- the people, the workers, everybody owns the piece of the pie. host: what does this have to do with the fiscal cliff? caller: well, if more -- if more people -- if more industries would go to that, they wouldn't fall off the cliff. everybody would go to work. host: mr. rosenberg? guest: so i haven't heard of that but it sounds like a great place to be and live. i would have to get the name of that again. host: next up is don on the washington redskins. -- "washington journal." caller: i've been on social security for several years now. it's my u
: philip. michigan. democratic caller. caller: thank you. this is not so much a tax question. i used to work for a food company in 1972 that was very large, employing 3000 or more, closing in 1985. people here have lost their jobs. why does the government not do something to cut their jobs? for instance, do we really need the cia, the federal marshals here and there? why do they not get the federal bureau to cover everything? host: that is philip's idea. on twitter, a follow-up with the small-business owner we heard from, saying they eliminated business averaging which is hopeful to small businesses with fluctuating income. guest: it guest: under income averaging, if you have a fluctuating in a come -- income, you pay low rates when your income is low, high rates when your income is high. the average maybe higher than if you had constant and come over that time. income averaging the be the ability to average over years and pay tax at a rate equal to the harvard marginal rates that would apply to your average income. it was an attempt to address the fluctuating income problem. host: m
spent 21 months recuperating from his wounds in an army hospital in michigan. there he met a lifetime friend, future majority leader bob dole, another young g.i. who had been also wounded in the european theater. senator dole told senator inouye he planned to go to law school and eventually serve in congress. dan inouye was elected to congress in 1959 as hawaii's first congressman. bob dole was elected to congress a year later. senator inouye always joked, i went with the dole plan and i beat him. three years later, dan inouye was elected to the senate and he's been a soft and powerful voice for the people of hawaii ever since. although senator inouye was an unabashed progressive democrat, he always put his country first and his party second. dan was a vibrant and vital presence in the senate and in death he'll remain a legend. his last words on earth, aloha. and it is with a heavy heart that i and we bid aloha, goodbye, i love you to a friend and legend of the senate, daniel ken inouye. >> good morning. on behalf of the united states house of representatives, i extend sincere condo l
and it's the first salvo, so, michigan mcconnell laughs at it and timothy geithner hands it to them. this isn't real. >> i didn't know that first was the first offer. we have been talk about this for months. why is it now, i'm sure after the election and everybody knew where both sides stood and you would think some sort of progress. >> thanksgiving congress was off and to today's point the christmas holiday coming up here, only a few weeks, the 30 day window is not a 30 day window. >> and all of the congressmen we speak to off camera, we say is there going to be a deal, probably in the last minute we'll hash something out a ridiculous charade. get it done. >> let us know. >> and this story keeps resonating. the beautiful story that the new york post captured this week after police officer who didn't know that his photo was being shot and he was giving a homeless man socks and shoes that he had bought out of his own pocket. the development. >> the n.y.p.d. officer on the screen, larry deprimmo, now the brother, a random act of kindness it wasn't something planned or thought out and
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18